Dirty Little Secrets for Translators

18
Sep

The word “irregardless”

Of course, there is such a word as irregardless!

In fact, it is a century-old colloquial word that means the same as irrespective and regardless, and it may have come about by some fusion or confusion of those two words. The use of irregardless is a common peeve among people who question illogical new words and phrases in English, but the word is not as bad as many people think. No English speaker who hears the word irregardless actually interprets it as meaning not without regard. We might find the word annoying, but we know exactly what the speaker means. And though irrespective and regardless have perhaps lost some ground since the arrival of irregardless, they are still widely used, and they prevail over irregardless by a large margin in edited publications.

Source: Grammarist

17
Sep

Myths about bilingualism

Bilingualism is extensive and yet it is surrounded by myths.
[…There are also the myths that real bilinguals do not have an accent in their different languages and that they are excellent all-around translators. This is far from being true. Having an accent or not does not make one more or less bilingual, and bilinguals often have difficulties translating specialized language… continue reading

Source: Psychology Today

Reference: Grosjean, François (2010). Bilingual: Life and Reality. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

17
Sep

Language pathway revealed

The long-standing 19th-century anatomical model of the brain’s language network just got a 21st-century upgrade. Marco Catani, a psychiatrist at the King’s College Institute of Psychiatry in London, and his colleagues have discovered a pathway that links the two primary language regions in the brain’s left hemisphere with a third region long suspected to contribute to human linguistic prowess. Found with a modified magnetic resonance imaging technique known as diffusion tensor tractography, the pathway affirms that “the circuit for language is more complex than we thought,” Catani says.Read more…

17
Sep

Forgotten? Try your other language

Any bilingual will tell you that there are concepts that are best articulated in a particular language. In fact, when bilingual friends or acquaintances fumble for the right word or expression, how many times have we not heard, or proposed ourselves, “Try your other language”. But words are just a small part of our knowledge. What about other forms of knowledge that we have stored in our memory?

Northwestern University researcher Viorica Marian has spent many years studying the link between language and memory. In one of her earlier studies… continued

Source: Psychology Today

17
Sep

illegible vs. unreadable

Illegible refers to texts that can’t be read due to bad handwriting, physical deterioration, or any other issue that makes the words difficult to decipher.

Unreadable is mainly used in reference to texts that are dull, nonsensical, uninteresting, or difficult.

Source: Grammarist